Breaching blue whale calf.

Bob Perryblue whales, common dolphins, Condor Express, fin whale, Santa Cruz Island

The numerous and mesmerizing ventral blubber grooves of a surface feeding giant blue whale. It's pectoral fin is in the air as the whale, on its side, ejects water from its gular pouch to feed.

2018 06-22 SB Channel

Captain Colton and his crew had a bonanza day with loads of wildlife.  The highlight of the trip was a breaching juvenile blue whale.  This is something that is very rare and has previously been reported only a few times.  Mother Nature was smiling on the Condor Express today.  Totals for the trip included:  13+ giant blue whales, 3 fin whales and 250 long-beaked common dolphins.

The Condor Express found a high stratus layer and extremely glassy surface conditions all day today.  In addition, that famous “Santa Barbara Channel cobalt blue” water color has moved in with fabulous clarity to enhance the sightings.  All the dolphins were spread out near the beach, from the harbor to the Carpinteria oil rigs.  Colton spent some quality time with these animals and great looks were had.

Out near the active Santa Cruz Island giant whale hot spot, the whale sightings began and stretched out to the west.  There were two blue whale mother-calf pairs (one had the very active youngster).  Many other whales were friendly with the boat.  Additional spouts that were all over the zone were not included in the totals above.  Among the fin whales, one had wonderfully long surface breathing times which resulting in fabulous sightings.

The active juvenile blue whale was with its mother and its tremendous breach splashes were seen from afar.  As the Condor Express slowly approached the activity, the breaches turned to head/chin lifts that took place as the pair swam quickly to the west with the other giants.  It was a breathtaking sight.

You never know what Mother Nature has in store.
Bob Perry
Condor Express, and